How To Thrive On Writing Rejection

May 2015 office

In my collection of notebooks and scrap paper, lies my collection of rejection notes dating back to my earliest days in the business. There is a good reason that I keep these and you should too. Rejection letters and notes do not always serve as a thumbs-down on your work. When it does, it should only serve as incentive for you to pick everything up and keep going.

How many of you have known people who have given this craft and business a chance, only to run away after a rejection letter? It’s understandable in a way. Especially if you are a sensitive person. I admit, I am like that. Yet, when it comes to writing I fully accept that my words are not going to necessarily appeal to everyone. Sure it would be great if it did. It’s just not the reality of the reading world.

Each rejection letter should be a learning experience. It should be viewed as an opportunity. It means your pitch, your piece, your content has been read by someone. They have taken all of it or a few lines from it and made their judgment on it to see if it fits what they are looking for.

Not building on these opportunities for improvement and continuous learning is a wasted opportunity in itself. Having the refresher is worth the time and effort. If a potential publisher gives you some specific feedback in relation to your content, all the better! Read that feedback and use it to your advantage. See if that feedback can be applied to any ongoing or existing projects you may have on the go.

Rejections are never to be considered negative reflections. Take whatever you can from each of those opportunities and build something bigger of your business. Keep looking for ways to write stronger and better. Revise the rejected content and see if it can be sold elsewhere.

Above all, keep at it.

@WriterDann

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